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Our top ten tips to improve RTW outcomes

Our top ten tips to improve RTW outcomes

   

Cheryl Griffiths | A back to the basics look at getting it right from the beginning
Research shows returning to work as quickly as possible after an injury or illness results is the best health outcome for workers. Handling the return to work of an injured or ill employee the right way from the beginning reduces the length of time it takes for the employee to return. Having a policy that supports the wellbeing of your employees reduces work disability costs and improves the company's results. more >>

The Juggling Act

The Juggling Act

 

Fayth Carrell | Return to work coordination and everything else.
I juggle. No, I don’t do party tricks. But I have a dual role and it often presents challenges in my working week. I’m not alone. Many RTW Coordinators balance their role with other responsibilities, sometimes complimentary, often at odds with their core responsibilities. For me it’s OH&S, but I know people who combine RTW with HR, IR, Payroll or even public liability and other insurances. more >>

What's work got to do...got to do with it?

What's work got to do...got to do with it?

   

Gabrielle Lis | Returning to work is even harder if the work itself feels meaningless. What makes a job meaningful?
In the modern world, writes Alain de Botton, work has taken on an extraordinary significance: it, along with love, is claimed ‘to be able to provide us…with the principal source of life’s meaning’. We sometimes like to think that our employers ask too much of us, but are we the ones asking too much of work? We are, according to Lucy Kellaway of the BBC Online. In an article entitled “The best way to find meaning at work? Don’t look for it,” she offers this anecdote in support of her argument: “Maybe the best way of dealing with pointlessness at work is not to worry too much about it. more >>

Re-calibrating Resilience - test your resilience strengths

Re-calibrating Resilience - test your resilience strengths

   

Robert Aurbach |
I've been writing since 2008 about why some people recover uneventfully while others with similar injuries sink into despair and dependency. Insight based upon discoveries in neuroscience has led to the development of a working understanding of why and how system created disability and secondary psychological overlay to claims occurs. It always seemed to me that the opposite side of the same coin was individual resilience. more >>

 

Most dangerous jobs: identified

National News
Published on July 18, 2016

The most recent set of data from Safe Work Australia shows that workers in the agriculture, forestry and fishery industries are at highest risk of injury and fatality. There were 686 deaths in these industries between 2003 and 2014, accounting for 23 percent of all workplace deaths. In 213 to 2014, they also had the third highest number of workers' compensation claims. Commercial fishing is regarded as the most dangerous job on the planet. Transport, postal and warehousing weren't far behind the agriculture, forestry and fishing statistics with 549 transport-related deaths. Freight transport alone was responsible for the deaths of 423 workers from 2003 to 2014.

 

Workers Comp: who gets to claim?

ACT News
Published on July 18, 2016

A young concreter was killed four years ago when struck by a 39 metre boom in Canberra. He did not have a will. His mother didn't think he was in a serious relationship, but he had been seeing a woman for eight months. The young woman lodged the claim for the death benefit via workers' compensation and the $200,000 was awarded to her, with the young man's family missing out. The decision was made as his girlfriend was financially dependent on him while his mother was not. His mother claimed she had seen no female possessions in the apartment, but his girlfriend produced text messages and letters. His mother is now suggesting that all employers ask their employees if they have a will.

 

Black lung: new strategy

QLD News
Published on July 18, 2016

A new action plan has been developed after eleven Queensland mine workers were diagnosed with black lung disease. The aim is to deliver best-practice in prevention, monitoring and screening. Queensland’s Natural Resources and Mines Minister Dr. Anthony Lynham said, "A miner with the first stages of coal workers’ pneumoconiosis may have no symptoms, but should not continue to work in a dusty environment, so the disease doesn’t progress...Early detection through an effective screening program is critical to protecting the current workforce."

 

Quad bike accident: $12m awarded

TAS News
Published on July 18, 2016

A British backpacker was awarded $12 million after becoming a quadriplegic as a result of a quad bike accident on a King Island farm. She had only been working there for a few weeks and was not properly trained. She was also not wearing a helmet. The worker is only likely to live for another 15 years and her family was therefore only awarded a quarter of the amount being sought. She is in need of 24 hour care. The division of costs are yet to be awarded but are expected to be in the millions as the case involved two countries. The payout is believed to be a Tasmanian record.