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On Being a Company Doctor

On Being a Company Doctor

    

Dr James Crompton | Dr James Crompton discusses the challenges and rewards of working as a company doctor.
I am a company doctor, working in a practice in a highly industrialised area of Melbourne with tourism, service, tertiary and manufacturing all booming on my doorstep.   The patients I care for are all from the local industry. When they develop a medical condition or sustain an injury whilst engaged in their work, I am engaged by the company. I specialise in dealing with musculoskeletal injuries and the vagaries of occupational rehabilitation. more >>

Role Summary: Psychologist

Role Summary: Psychologist

      

Anne Richey | Psychology is the study of the mind and associated behaviours. A psychologist's focus may be on either individuals or groups.
40 higher education providers around Australia offer accredited and approved three year psychology degrees. To become a registered psychologist, the degrees must have been approved by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC) and the Psychology Board of Australia (PsyBA).    To become a clinical psychologist, a further one year of additional study is needed.  Prospective psychologists can then do either two years of supervised work, or fifth year of study and one year of supervised work. more >>

How to get the best out of your physiotherapist

How to get the best out of your physiotherapist

   

Anne Richey | Physiotherapy treatment is common for a range of standard conditions, particularly including musculoskeletal injuries.
In a standard physiotherapy practice, more than 80% of patients are private patients paying private rates, with sessions lasting for between 20 and 30 minutes. Physiotherapists frequently undertake musculoskeletal assessments, offer advice, and develop a graduated loading program consisting of exercise and activity. Their real skill is in the ability to judge when people are able to return to their previous activities. more >>

Court between a rock and a hard place

Court between a rock and a hard place

   

Anna Kelsey-Sugg | Some regard the courts as a necessary evil in injury compensation; but how can they be used to foster good?
Despite the fact that only a minority of injury claims cases go to the courts, they carry a huge weight in determining the outcomes for a small proportion of cases and – along with legal practitioners – have a significant amount of influence over cases that are settled. And word filters down. When the courts are generous to workers in awarding payments, the rate of lawyers' advertising goes up, and the proportion of cases going to court goes up. more >>

Superdoc (11) - Claims staff turnover?  No surprises when you think about it

Superdoc (11) - Claims staff turnover? No surprises when you think about it

  

SuperDoc | Job turnover in claims staff is high; if staff felt they could make a positive difference, they'd be more likely to hang around.
Would you believe me if I told you that prior to working as an incredible superhero doctor, I worked in community arts? No? Fair play; it’s not true. But I know plenty who occupy the field. They tell me it takes a degree to get a community arts entry position, even to a basic position such as a receptionist, and it’s often rewarded with a low salary. Even people who have worked in the field for a decade still often earn as little as $30 – $40,000 per annum. more >>

 

Discussing Work Contribution: Part 2

Blog

Dr Mary Wyatt | Epidemiology is the study of populations. It's is about studying how frequently individuals get certain problems, which groups of people get certain problems, and what happens to problems over time.
Today I want to talk about Occupational Epidemiology. That might include studying an epidemic, such as the spread of the AIDS virus. It might involve studying the occurrence of asthma, which groups of people get asthma, and what factors might increase the risk of asthma in the various demographics. Occupational epidemiology studies what happens to the population of people who are working. more >>

 

FIFO Workers: needing protection

National News
Published on June 29, 2015

A WA Parliamentary Inquiry has made several recommendations on protecting the mental health of Fly In Fly Out (FIFO) workers, however the inquiry is facing criticism for focusing on "a misleading aspect of mental health." This aspect is that 20-45 year old males are most at risk of mental health issues, and this is the main demographic of FIFO workers. The article claims that "The focus on vulnerability...fuels the rhetoric that organisations have little contribution to psychosocial outcomes at work." The inquiry has however made recommendations on rostering, fatigue and anti-bullying strategies.

 

Work Safety: Heights

National News
Published on June 30, 2015

In 2012, falls from heights accounted for 7,400 workers' compensation claims, and injuries for falling objects accounted for 4,200 claims. These two types of incident combined accounted for around 20% of injuries. There are various methods available to mitigate the risks, as the Chair of the Working from Height Association explains. While hard hats may be useful in some incidents, they certainly don't protect the workers under all circumstances. Education, awareness and safety management systems all need to be put in place.

 

Tutor: injured while teaching chainsaw course

World News
Published on June 29, 2015

A New Zealand college has been ordered to pay $40,000 to a tutor after an incident occurred on his first day at work. He was teaching chainsaw operations as part of a forest operations course. Tree felling was not a part of the course. The tutor was severely injured when crushed by a tree he was felling. It was found that his employers failed to take all practicable steps to  ensure that no employee was injured at work, and that no action or inaction of an employee harmed another person. They also failed to provide a written process on how to source wood safely and on when tree felling could occur.

 

Rock Stars: a dangerous biz

World News
Published on June 30, 2015

A researcher at the University of Sydney has found that between 1940 and 2014, the lifespans for musicians were up to 25 years shorter than the comparable US population. They were also found to be at greater risk of suicide, homicide and accidents. She questioned which other workplace would allow pyrotechnics so close to workers. If employees in a standard workplace were falling off elevated chairs or being burnt by halogen lamps, it is highly likely that something would be done about it. The list of injuries suffered by well known musicians is a long one.

 

WorkCover NSW: criticised for inaction

NSW News
Published on June 29, 2015

WorkCover NSW has been criticised for failing to act on the WorkCover Independent Review, delivered in November 2013. The report found that workers were put at a "double disadvantage" under the 2012 changes whereby each insurer makes a work capacity decision about the injured worker. This is used in the decision regarding weekly compensation. The changes also removed the right of workers to have their legal costs paid by insurers when disputes arose. Lawyers are also prohibited from charging for advice in such matters causing them to rely on pro bono work - unlike the insurers.