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2015 RTW Matters Reader Survey: Feedback

2015 RTW Matters Reader Survey: Feedback

   

RTWMatters team | This survey article looks at how you use the RTW Matters website. What's useful? How do you use the information? How can we improve the service?
The advice and suggestions offered in our previous surveys have been introduced and acted upon where possible, and we expect to do the same with the survey this year.   This article shares how other readers use RTW Matters for their own benefit, or to inform others.   What are the unexpected advantages, usefulness or value of being a RTW Matters member?   When we received the results to the question, “Did you find unexpected advantages, usefulness or value during your membership period?” we decided to group the answers into themes. more >>

Case Study: Injured, But not at Work. What to do?

Case Study: Injured, But not at Work. What to do?

    

Dr Mary Wyatt | Joe, a 45-year-old storeman, fractured his left thumb in an injury mowing his lawn at home. A thumb fracture can take months to heal.
After 6 weeks Joe's accident, his specialist cleared him to return to modified duties, not lifting over 10 kg.   Joe rang the human resources department, keen to resume work. He had run out of sick leave within 2 weeks of his injury.   This prompted the workplace to consider how they should deal with injuries not caused by the workplace. There had been requests from 3 workers to return to work on modified duties for non-work-related conditions over the last 6 months. more >>

Case Study: How Things Can Go Wrong in Compensation Cases

Case Study: How Things Can Go Wrong in Compensation Cases

  

Dr Mary Wyatt | This case study looks at the additional injuries which can occur as a result of the workplace injury.
Mr C works in a factory, in a physically taxing job which involves significant heavy lifting. One day he was lifting an item using an overhead crane with a suction device. The suction device failed and the item fell. Mr C pushed it away, and as he did so he turned suddenly.   Mr C experienced immediate severe back pain, along with pain in his right leg. Although the supervisor told him to rest, there was reluctance about him seeking medical advice. more >>

Case study: Flexible approaches can kickstart cases

Case study: Flexible approaches can kickstart cases

   

Stefanie Garber | Despite the best efforts of the return to work manager, some cases seem to make little progress. Looking beyond the physical injury for solutions can help boost a client's chances of returning to work.
Soccer was Nick’s passion in life. He liked to talk about it to his friends, read about it on the sports pages and, of course, play on weekends with his club. To keep up his fitness, he ran every day through the park near his house. Nick moved to Australia from Greece. He soon found a job as a chef at a high-end restaurant. The position involved frequent lifting and bending, as well as standing for the eight to ten hour shifts. more >>

How one company turned 13 workers' compensation claims into two

How one company turned 13 workers' compensation claims into two

      

Anna Kelsey-Sugg | Seventy work-sites to manage, different styles of management, a tough work culture, misconceptions about what's involved. Annette Photios had her work cut out when she stepped into her role.
Read the article right through or follow the links to skip to the parts that you're more interested in. “They've got a right, they've got entitlements and we've got to look after them. They're our employees, they're our resource, they're our responsibility.” – Annette Photios   Part one: Challenges to overcome Part two: Turning things around Part three: Creating solutions Part four: Ingredients for success A workplace of over 600 employees, some 60 Victorian sites, a predominantly mobile workforce and a list of challenges to overcome longer than your arm. more >>

 

Bullying and social media: Aged Care Homes

National News
Published on July 20, 2015

The head of Hynes Legal's aged care and retirement living team told the Nurses in Aged Care Conference that they are seeing two to three providers each with seeking advice regarding social media, often regarding the bullying of other staff members or revealing details of residents and their families. The risks include privacy issues, IP infringements, bullying claims.brand damage, defamation, breach of contract and potentially unfair dismissal claims. 'Vicarious liability' is a possibility for the providers unless employers could prove that they had taken all reasonable steps to prevent it occurring.

 

NSW: splitting workers' comp

NSW News
Published on July 21, 2015

The NSW Government is planning to split the workers' compensation scheme into three authorities. The aim is to prevent conflicts of interest, and to assuage perceptions that it's pro-employer/pro-insurer. In NSW, WorkCover is currently both the insurer and regulator. The new scheme aims to remove the Independent Review Office from beneath the WorkCover umbrella. Although he didn't comment directly on the changes, Finance Minister Dominic Perrottet said, "I am committed to running a fair and sustainable workers' compensation scheme."

 

QLD: simpler for injured workers to pursue legal claims

QLD News
Published on July 20, 2015

The Palaszczuk Government has introduced legislation to the State Parliament which will make it simpler for injured workers to pursue legal claims through the courts. They are reinstating common law rights for injured workers who can prove negligence on the part of their employer. They will also remove the permanent impairment threshold which prevented many from accessing the courts. In addition, employers will no longer be able to access a prospective employer's claims history. The Queensland government's stated aim is to "deliver ongoing savings and improvements...without attacking the basis entitlements and rights of workers."

 

Latrobe Valley: two more WorkSafe inspectors

VIC News
Published on July 21, 2015

More than 2,100 workers have been injured in the Latrobe Valley in the past five years, with a total cost of $135 million in compensation and medical treatment. As a result, two new WorkSafe inspectors have been allocated to the area. The Latrobe Valley is home to a large number of high risk industries, particularly farming. The aim is for the new inspectors to help businesses to prevent accidents, as well as investigating accidents.