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Influence: Creating an environment of success

Influence: Creating an environment of success

   

Carolyn Mounce |
Over the past eight articles we have looked at techniques being adopted in business and marketing to influence outcomes. We have seen that: It is possible to have service without influence, but not influence without service.   Success is 10% technical ability and 90% people skills.   There is power in acknowledging a claimant and making them an ally, rather than an adversary. more >>

Influence: Language - a goldmine of potential

Influence: Language - a goldmine of potential

   

Carolyn Mounce | What do you think of when you think of the words: injured worker, claimant, client, worker? Are your thoughts different? How does that impact return to work?
Where do you fit in your “scheme”? Are you the insurer, the agent, the case manager, the injury management advisor, the senior executive, the regulator, the government official, the scheme strategist, the actuary, the general practitioner, the specialist, the allied health provider, the rehabilitation provider, the employer, the return to work coordinator, the self-insured, the plaintiff lawyer, the lawyer, the advocate, the union official, the injured worker…? Everyone has a title, and with each title comes expectations, perceptions and projections. more >>

Influence: Six tips to reduce resistance and overcome objections

Influence: Six tips to reduce resistance and overcome objections

   

Carolyn Mounce |
In my last article I discussed the agreement frame, and simple language that can allow you to disagree while maintaining rapport. So what if we took the agreement frame one step further – by knowing the types of resistance and objections in advance? Resistance defined Resistance is now being actively researched by academics. Dr Eric Knowles, in the book Resistance and Persuasion, classifies resistance into four different, but related categories: Reactance: The person feels like they are being pushed as a part of influencing them through the process. more >>

 

Who's the "client" and who's the customer?

Blog

Robert Aurbach | Workers' compensation is a strange kind of insurance. The employer pays for it, but it's the injured person who is supposed to get the services and benefits.
Workers' compensation is a strange kind of insurance. The employer pays for it, but only gets the indirect benefits of compliance with the law and immunity from many common law actions. It's the injured person who is supposed to get the services and benefits. So we have to ask "Who does the insurer work for: the employer who pays the premium, or the person who has the injury and is covered by the policy? " To whom does the insurer owe its allegiance? The people in charge of workers' compensation schemes sometimes seem to get confused about this issue. more >>

 

Study estimates persistent pain incidence at 19% of U.S. adults

World News

A new study published in The Journal of Pain reports that 39 million people in the United States or 19 percent have persistent pain, and the incidence varies according to age and gender. The authors noted that persistent pain correlated with other indices of health-related quality of life, such as anxiety, depression and fatigue. Individuals with those conditions were far more likely to report persistent pain.

 

People with mental health disorders twice as likely to have heart disease or stroke

World News

People facing mental health challenges are significantly more likely to have heart disease or stroke, according to a new study. "This population is at high risk, and it's even greater for people with multiple mental health issues," says Dr. Katie Goldie. The study found that: People who have had a mental health disorder at any point in their life were twice as likely to have had heart disease or have experienced a stroke.

 

Analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs may have an impact on depression

World News

Analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs used against muscle pain and arthritis may have a beneficial effect on depression symptoms. Ordinary over the counter painkillers and anti-inflammatory drugs purchased from pharmacies may also be effective in the treatment of people suffering of depression. This is shown by the largest ever meta-analysis, based on 14 international studies with a total 6,262 patients who either suffered from depression or had individual symptoms of depression.

 

ACT public service tops mental health claims

ACT News

ACT government bureaucrats lodged 3.6 mental health claims per 1000 workers in 2013-14, compared with 1.9 claims per 1000 workers from the Australian Public Service, Sydney Morning Herald reports. The figures come from evidence to a Senate Estimate hearings by Comcare this week. In comparison, private sector workers lodged just 0.4 claims per 1000 in the same period.

 

Charities stunned by significant WorkCover levy increases

SA News

South Australia's charities are demanding WorkCover explain why their combined levies rose by more than $10 million in 2012/13, ABC News reports. "(South Australian Council of Social Services) executive director Ross Womersley said a change in the rating system had seen the levy jump for at least one charity by as much as 400 per cent, an increase he said WorkCover had refused to explain."

 

Victorian job stress claims snowball to $273m

VIC News

58 compensation claims for psychological injuries are being approved every week in Victoria, reports The Age. The annual amount paid out in compensation for mental health disorders has snowballed by 45 per cent to $273 million, with the annual number of claims rising by almost 470 over the past five years. "Cases like these get people thinking about their own workplace and conditions, and reflecting more objectively about situations they may be tolerating," beyondblue head of workplace policy Nick Arvanitis said. "People are more willing to speak up."