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Sprains and strains causing RTW pain?

Sprains and strains causing RTW pain?

   

Gabrielle Lis | How-to Guide: Using modified duties to promote durable return to work.
Kris Fraser is a registered occupational therapist and certified professional ergonomist who works at the University of Queensland, where she is responsible for the prevention and management of musculoskeletal disorders across 34 sites, amongst 16 000 staff. She deals with between 30 and 40 compensable injuries a year, most of which are sprains and strains.  Compared to other similar organisations, the U of Q performs very well in terms of return to work, especially regarding the resumption of normal duties. more >>

Outside the city, outside the square

Outside the city, outside the square

   

Antonia George | In a close-knit rural community, one RTWC's resourceful approach transforms a movement-limiting spinal injury into a business and career opportunity.
Is it true that country people possess a level of inventiveness little known to urban dwellers? I think there’s some truth to the idea. Perhaps it has to do with having fewer resources in a rural community, in contrast to the diverse level of resources available in the big smoke. In the country it’s sometimes necessary to just “make do”.  Bill Hudd is the Staff Development Manager at Banner Hardware in Mt Gambier, a proud South Australian family-owned company. more >>

Loss of motivation is common when people remain on part-time modified duties

Loss of motivation is common when people remain on part-time modified duties

    

Sarah Duffield | A project manager develops an overuse injury and is still on part-time restricted duties after many months.
UNKNOWN { 12483224867960: } Case history: Ms JS is a 44 year old project manager with a large organisation. Her job is full time and her duties include a large amount of computer and mouse use. She began experiencing soreness in her right forearm and to a lesser extent her right arm. Over a period of several months her symptoms intensified what is described as a severe and often excruciating pain. more >>

When adequate rehabilitation is not enough

When adequate rehabilitation is not enough

    

Sarah Duffield | A long-term stable worker sustains a significant hip injury. While he has returned to work on restricted duties, a long term view is needed.
Case history: Mr JB is a 34 year old security alarm installer. He has been with his company for 12 years. The job requires him to repeatedly climb ladders, work in roof spaces and maintain and sustain awkward postures. In December 2006 JB was driving to a job when he was involved in a motor vehicle accident. JB sustained a fracture to his left hip, resulting from the head of the femur pushing through the acetabulum (the cup-shaped socket of the hip joint). more >>

Managing chronic pain and return to work in the real world - A case study

Managing chronic pain and return to work in the real world - A case study

   

Dr Mary Wyatt | Chronic pain is challenging to manage - here is a case that was complex but where input and a structured approach paid off.
Take Home Messages: Rehabilitation can be complex and challenging. However, the benefits of getting back to work are significant for the person and for the employer and the community. Factors that contributed to a successful outcomes in this case include: 1.    Using a collaborative approach; 2.    Consistency of message; 3.    A community-based approach focusing on changing beliefs and improving coping strategies; 4. more >>

 

Any job isn't necessarily better for health

National News

The Conversation reports that poor quality work can be worse for you than no work at all. "Being in poor-quality work which, perhaps, is boring, routine or represents underemployment or a poor match for the employee’s skills is widely regarded as a good way for the unemployed to remain connected to the labour market...[But] data contradicts this. [It] shows unambiguously that the psychosocial quality of bad jobs is worse than unemployment." The Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey reports that: "Those who moved into optimal jobs showed significant improvement in mental health compared to those who remained unemployed. Those respondents who moved into poor-quality jobs showed a significant worsening in their mental health compared to those who remained unemployed."

 

An exploration of the basis for patient complaints about the oldness of magazines in practice waiting rooms: cohort study

World News

Cutting-edge research has finally put to rest one of the most plaguing medical questions of our time: "Why are doctor's room magazines so old?" The research, conducted at a New Zealand GP waiting room, involved both "gossipy" and "non-gossipy" material. The study concluded: "General practice waiting rooms contain mainly old magazines. This phenomenon relates to the disappearance of the magazines rather than to the supply of old ones. Gossipy magazines were more likely to disappear than non-gossipy ones. On the grounds of cost we advise practices to supply old copies of non-gossipy magazines. A waiting room science curriculum is urgently needed."

 

Do workplace wellness plans actually improve health?

World News

Wellness plans are an increasing feature of the workplace, yet there's little evidence to support their effectiveness in improving the health of workers, NPR Blogs reports. "One thing we do know is that wellness is particularly popular with employers right now, as they seek ways to slow the rise of health spending," reports NPR. "'In a company with 10,000 workers...they might have had 10 heart attacks, of which one may have been theoretically preventable with a wellness program.' That's a big reason why most independent studies have found little or no cost savings." Health economists postulate that wellness programs achieve cost-savings for businesses by shifting costs of care to workers.

 

Twitter posts may shine a fresh light on mental illness trends

World News

By reviewing tweets from users who publicly mentioned their diagnosis and by looking for language cues linked to certain disorders, researchers say, they’ve been able to quickly and inexpensively collect new data on post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, bipolar disorder and seasonal affective disorder. “Using Twitter to get a fix on mental health cases could be very helpful to health practitioners and governmental officials who need to decide where counselling and other care is needed most."

 

Wealth, power or lack thereof at heart of many mental disorders

World News

Berkeley researchers have linked inflated or deflated feelings of self-worth to such afflictions as bipolar disorder, narcissistic personality disorder, anxiety and depression, providing yet more evidence that the widening gulf between rich and poor can be bad for your health. “People prone to depression or anxiety reported feeling little sense of pride in their accomplishments and little sense of power,” Johnson said. “In contrast, people at risk for mania tended to report high levels of pride and an emphasis on the pursuit of power despite interpersonal costs."

 

Injured worker costs being shifted to Centrelink and Medicare: NSW Law Society

NSW News

While the NSW Government celebrates a reduction in workers' compensation claims, the NSW Law Society says injured workers who are unable to access compensation are being supported by Centrelink and Medicare instead, Sydney Morning Herald reports. "People just give up and go away," said Law Society president Ros Everett. "They are not returning to work. They are relying on Medicare and Centrelink." Referring to an appeal she lodged, which was still outstanding five months after the 30-day period it should have taken to process, Ms Everett said "The scheme agents are out of control. They don't even respond to me."