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Lifestyle Factors: Nutrition & RTW

Lifestyle Factors: Nutrition & RTW

  

Anne Richey | Absenteeism due to employee health costs Australian businesses around $7 billion annually and poor nutrition plays a large part in it.
Absenteeism due to employee health costs Australian businesses around $7 billion annually and poor nutrition plays a large part in it.   A Medibank Private study The Health of Australia’s Workforce (2005) found that healthy workers tend to be three times more productive than their unhealthy colleagues. Unhealthy employees also access up to nine times the sick leave of their healthy counterparts. more >>

Prehabilitation: improving the results of surgery

Prehabilitation: improving the results of surgery

   

Anne Richey | Prehabilitation is an approach to aid people recover from surgery and increase the likelihood of a good outcome.
Prehabilitation helps people improve their functional capacity through optimising their physical and psychological health.   Studies have shown that people with low fitness and poor eating habits have an increased risk of complications following surgery. This can result in further operations or delayed recovery.   This can be particularly important after a work injury, with time off work or on reduced duties. more >>

Top ten reasons to have a health and wellbeing program

Top ten reasons to have a health and wellbeing program

   

Gabrielle Lis | Need some ammunition to make the case for investment in health and wellbeing? Look no further than our latest top ten...
1.    You can expect a 300% return on investment. Health and wellbeing programs provide an excellent return on investment because they reduce: Compensation costs; Absenteeism / sick days / lost time; Presenteeism, or when workers come to work but have reduced productivity; and Staff turnover. 2.    Many key risk factors for common illnesses are modifiable. more >>

 

Work for the Dole: not covered by WorkCover

National News
Published on April 25, 2016

The Australian Unemployed Workers' Union president is seeking the abolishment of the Work for the Dole Scheme. The campaign follows the death of an 18 year old man who fell from a trailer being towed by a tractor in Toowoomba. Unemployed workers have no access to WorkCover as they are technically not working. There are also accusations that the safety of workers cannot be guaranteed."It does bring into question whether the Work for the Dole measure is providing adequate occupational health and safety for those forced to participate," the Australian Greens spokeswoman on community services Senator Rachel Siewert said.

 

Franchisees: employees missing out on compensation

National News
Published on April 25, 2016

Law firm Maurice Blackburn is calling for the introduction of new laws to make franchisors responsible for the actions of franchisees when worklace laws are breached. Some franchisees employ people as independent contractors to avoid correct payment of wages and avoid paying for their workers' compensation. A contractor hired by a fast food chain tried to lodge a WorkCover claim, however his employer told him he wasn't eligible. He was also asked to sign a contract stating that he wasn't an employee. Former consumer watchdog Alan Fels agrees that a change in law is required.

 

Black Lung: 'the tip of the iceberg'

National News
Published on April 25, 2016

Union workers and their families gathered outside Queensland's parliament house to demand immediate action from the government to stop black lung disease. The disease is caused by prolonged exposure to coal dust, and is frequently associated with mining. The disease was eliminated thirty years ago in Queensland but has made a resurgence. Since September 2015, six cases have been confirmed. The unions are arguing that dust levels need to be reduced and for medical assessors to be independent from mining companies who conduct health checks. The union is claiming that at least 15 more people have the disease in the state.

 

Restaurants: areas of concern

WA News
Published on April 26, 2016

WorkSafe inspectors in 2014 and 2015 found issues of serious concern in Western Australian cafes and restaurants. The sector was identified as having the highest rate of lost time injuries. In five years, WA employees in the sector suffered over one thousand injuries requiring them to take time off work.WorkSafe acting executive director Joe Attard said that the "combination of young workers and high turnover of staff makes issues such as adequate training a high priority, especially when it comes to manual tasks, slips, trips and falls, burns, knife safety and the use of hazardous substances.”