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Strategic implementation Q&A

Strategic implementation Q&A

  

Gabrielle Lis | How to take the long view and get where you want to go, faster.
Q: What is strategic planning? A: Strategic planning refers to a process of creating and arranging your resources to achieve long-term objectives. Q: Why should I develop a strategy? A: Identifying and articulating a strategy allows everyone to talk through the aims and agree on objectives.  The process of talking through and coming to agreement engages people along the way, and if people are involved the strategy is more likely to be successful. more >>

How to tip the balance AWAY from claims for strains and sprains

How to tip the balance AWAY from claims for strains and sprains

   

Gabrielle Lis | Practical tips for reducing musculoskeletal claims
An organisation’s injury management culture has a huge impact on claim behaviour… BEST PRACTICE GEMS: What DECREASES the chance of claims? Addressing the non-physical factors: conflict, attitude, culture. Anyone who’s worked in RTW for a while knows: claiming is rarely just about injury. The deciding factor in whether or not someone with a strain or sprain decides to make a claim is often non-physical, so: Don’t let conflict fester; Pay attention to the worker’s mindset / levels of rehab motivation; and Encourage a participative injury management culture. more >>

Measuring employer and employee efforts toward RTW

Measuring employer and employee efforts toward RTW

  

Dr Mary Wyatt | Researchers suggest shifting from a straightforward evaluation of capacity and duties to more personal factors such as the relationship between the employee and the employer.
Return-to-work effort sufficiency (RTW-ES) is a measure used in the Netherlands. Individuals who have applied for disability benefits go through a review process as part of their application. Effort sufficiency is an assessment of the endeavours undertaken by both the employee and the employer. For example, has the employer provided appropriate modified duties? Has the employee accepted what is deemed to be a medically suitable job? Has rehabilitation occurred? The claims assessor reviews whether there has been sufficient effort put into return-to-work by the employee and the employer. more >>

 

The toxic effect of the system - more in some jurisdictions and less in others

Blog

Dr Mary Wyatt | The issues that occur seem to be universal, but more in some schemes.
I’m Victoria based. Once a month I travel to South Australia and Western Australia to see patients. Over the last few years it has been fascinating to compare different compensation systems through the lens of the patient. There is a notable difference in how the schemes affect people. When patients provide a history they are essentially tell their story. How the system is treating them impacts how they tell their story. more >>

 

Govt. to focus on public service "compo culture"

National News

The Abbott government has begun working on reforms to Commonwealth workers' compensation schemes, reports Canberra Times. "Employment Department officials are working on changes that will attack the most controversial aspects of the Commonwealth's schemes – payouts for psychological injuries, compensation for life, and taxpayer-funded access to dubious therapies." 

 

Perfectionism a risk factor for suicide

National News

Perfectionism is a bigger risk factor in suicide than we may think, says York University Psychology Professor Gordon Flett, calling for closer attention to its potential destructiveness, adding that clinical guidelines should include perfectionism as a separate factor for suicide risk assessment and intervention. “There is an urgent need for looking at perfectionism with a person-centred approach as an individual and societal risk factor, when formulating clinical guidelines for suicide risk assessment and intervention, as well as public health approaches to suicide prevention." Researchers note that physicians, lawyers and architects, whose occupations emphasise on precision, and also those in leadership roles are at higher risk for perfectionism-related suicide, citing the recent cases of prominent perfectionists who died by suicide.

 

5 ways stress interrupts good sleep, and how to fix it

World News

Stress can diminish the quality of sleep and increase your risk of insomnia, Huffington Post reports. "According to the American Psychological Association's Stress in America survey, 43 percent of adults say that stress causes them to lie awake at night, and more than 50 percent of adults report feeling sluggish or lazy after a night of little sleep." The article offers five suggestions for improving stress levels and quality of sleep.

 

Group nature walks linked to improved mental health

World News

They are common suggestions to remedy stress: You just need a breath of fresh air. Walk it off. Get out and see people. Turns out all those things combined may in fact make you feel better – a lot better – a new large-scale study suggests. Group nature walks are linked with significantly lower depression, less perceived stress and enhanced mental health and well-being, according to the study conducted by the University of Michigan. “Walking is an inexpensive, low risk and accessible form of exercise and it turns out that combined with nature and group settings, it may be a very powerful, under-utilised stress buster. Our findings suggest that something as simple as joining an outdoor walking group may not only improve someone’s daily positive emotions but may also contribute a non-pharmacological approach to serious conditions like depression.”

 

Eating five a day may keep the blues away

World News

Fruit and vegetable consumption could be as good for your mental as your physical health, new research suggests. The research found that high and low mental wellbeing were consistently associated with an individual’s fruit and vegetable consumption. 33.5% of respondents with high mental wellbeing ate five or more portions of fruit and vegetables a day, compared with only 6.8% who ate less than one portion. “The data suggest that higher an individual’s fruit and vegetable intake the lower the chance of their having low mental wellbeing”.

 

How physical exercise protects the brain from stress-induced depression

World News

Physical exercise has many beneficial effects on human health, including the protection from stress-induced depression. However, until now the mechanisms that mediate this protective effect have been unknown. In a new study in mice, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden show that exercise training induces changes in skeletal muscle that can purge the blood of a substance that accumulates during stress, and is harmful to the brain.