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The power of learned optimism

The power of learned optimism

    

Scott Sanderson | How 'learned optimism' can improve return to work outcomes: Breaking down Theo Feldbrugge's webinar presentation.
“Whether you think you can or you think you can’t, you’re probably right” Henry Ford. A happy and healthy worker is often a more successful worker. An optimistic worker is also likely to be back at work sooner. While many things contribute to health and happiness, numerous studies have cited the importance of a positive state of mind. When it comes to injured workers, having an optimistic outlook is a key asset when dealing with the adversity of physical and/or mental harm. more >>

Emotional resilience: 2

Emotional resilience: 2

    

Tom Barton | This second of a two-part series investigates identifying pessimistic thinking in employees, and improving optimism and emotional resilience in the workplace.
In part one, we looked at how individuals’ pessimistic "explanatory styles" can hinder their recovery, diminish return to work outcomes, decrease productivity and increase their chance of illness or injury by more than twice. For those injured workers who have a tendency to err on the side of pessimism, the likelihood of developing secondary problems is greatly increased. Profiling workers’ explanatory styles helps to gauge whether an individual tends towards an optimistic or pessimistic world-view. more >>

Teaching WorkCover claimants to sell themselves

Teaching WorkCover claimants to sell themselves

    

Elizabeth Quinn | In pain, low in confidence, and down at heart: it can be a hard slog to get back into the workforce. Here's the juice on helping people find a job.
The debilitating effects of an accident at home, at work or on the road, can be far-reaching.  The impact is usually physical, but also affects a person's confidence and self-esteem. A prolonged recuperation is not the ideal preparation for venturing back into a workplace that may be unfamiliar, requiring a different set of skills to those required throughout previous employment. Newly acquired physical limitations might place restrictions on the range of occupations a person can undertake, and this, combined with the added stress of entering the job market after a long absence, can combine to make the prospect a daunting one for the majority of people returning to work. more >>

Research short: link found between pain symptoms and confidence

Research short: link found between pain symptoms and confidence

    

Dr Mary Wyatt | Believing that you can cope with whatever life brings you has a positive impact on pain symptoms - and there are ways of assessing coping confidence at work.
Chronic pain costs the community an enormous amount and can be devastating for the individual.  If we understand the factors that result in long term disability we are more likely to be able to help those with chronic pain. For their individual situation, their family, the workplace and the community. “Self-efficacy” is the belief that you will cope with whatever life brings you. more >>

 

The importance of work in health recovery

National News

Australia's largest life insurer TAL has become a signatory to the Australasian Consensus Statement on the Health Benefits of Work, released by the Australasian Faculty of Occupational and Environmental Medicine of The Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP). "Our own experience shows that when people return to work sooner rather than later that it promotes recovery and helps restore self-esteem and a sense of worth after being struck down by injury or illness."

 

Paracetamol doesn't help back pain

World News

Paracetamol is no more effective than a placebo for relieving back pain, according to a new study - Sydney Morning Herald reports. Surprisingly, the Sydney University research is the first large-scale trial comparing paracetamol to placebo for treatment of back pain. "This study would suggest that probably the most important thing a patient does is to resume normal activities."

 

Extra exercise helps depressed smokers kick the habit faster

World News

People diagnosed with depression need to step out for a cigarette twice as often as smokers who are not dealing with a mood disorder. And those who have the hardest time shaking off the habit may have more mental health issues than they are actually aware of. Yet a bit more exercise has been shown to reduce the compulsion to reach for a cigarette - even if it is not enough to alleviate the symptoms of the depression itself.

 

Obesity linked to low endurance, increased fatigue in the workplace

World News

Workplaces may need to consider innovative methods to prevent fatigue from developing in employees who are obese. Based on results from a new study published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene (JOEH), workers who are obese may have significantly shorter endurance times when performing workplace tasks, compared with non-obese counterparts.

 

Seven traits of the "mentally tough"

World News

Neurobiologist and psychologist Dr Angela Duckworth has studied thousands of people to understand how they've achieved success, The Age reports. "In all of these different contexts, one characteristic emerged as a predictor for success. It wasn't social intelligence, good looks, IQ, or physical health," rather, it was "grit", or "mental toughness." Follow the heading link for seven traits of the mentally tough.

 

Jennifer Taylor will replace Paul O'Connor as CEO of Comcare

ACT News

Department of Employment deputy secretary Jennifer Taylor will replace Comcare's current CEO Paul O'Connor as his term expires late next month, Sydney Morning Herald reports. "Comcare is facing many challenges in the coming years including improving return-to-work outcomes and work health and safety in the Commonwealth," said Minister for Employment Eric Abetz. "Ms Taylor's varied experience in the Australian Public Service will be of great benefit to the agency and assist it in meeting those challenges."