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Webinar Recording: How PAIN can be the key to successful RTW

Webinar Recording: How PAIN can be the key to successful RTW

   

Pam Garton, Abilita Services | This webinar discusses how gains can be made by understanding the complexity of factors that contribute to pain and disability.
Occupational Therapist Pam Garton, illustrates the underlying paradigm shift in thinking that it is necessary to achieve improved management of personal injuries. This webinar discusses how gains can be made by understanding the complexity of factors that contribute to pain and disability, and by using available tools to measure and modify those factors. Specifically, Pam discusses how pain can be used as part of the solution to successful return to work using sample case studies. more >>

The Stress Series Part 3 - Prevention programs in the workplace

The Stress Series Part 3 - Prevention programs in the workplace

    

Anna Kelsey-Sugg | Employers can take action to beat the problem of stress before it even arises. This article looks at the benefits of stress prevention programs.
The most obvious solution to the problem of stress in the workplace is to prevent it from occurring in the first place. Factors that lead to stress can be reduced if not eliminated by establishing good prevention programs and employing preventative techniques in the workplace. What can employers do?   Start with the organisation's leaders.  Are they interested in people, do they understand people?  If not, it is unlikely changing systems will be effective. more >>

Firefighters seriously injured on the job and the decision to return to high risk work

Firefighters seriously injured on the job and the decision to return to high risk work

 

Anne Richey | The researchers aimed to discover why people chose to return to the same high-risk careers after suffering a serious work-related injury.
Two firefighters from the New York metropolitan area were interviewed for this study.   The researchers sought to explore: Volition: the feelings about performance in the environment and the aspects which they find to be enjoyable. Volition may be divided into three areas – personal causation, values and interests – and they interact to determine how people think, feel and decide to engage in occupations. more >>

Occupational Stress in the Ambulance Service: a diagnostic study

Occupational Stress in the Ambulance Service: a diagnostic study

Anne Richey | Due to political and economic change, demands on public servants are escalating in a back ground of decreasing resources. Research into the ambulance service tends to be based on the explicit assumption that the work is inherently stressful.
The purpose of this study was to undertake an investigation of work stress in the ambulance service, to assess if the results of stress could be measured and compared with other occupational groups.  In this study a comparison was made to the fire service.   427 emergency service workers from the ambulance and fire services of a large northern England city were sent questionnaires. more >>

 

A Patient's History: Forgetfulness

Blog

Dr Mary Wyatt | By and large, the patient's narrative of their medical condition is accepted as factual. I'm talking here about the history of their condition, such as whether they suffered from shoulder pain prior to an injury which occurred when they fell at work.
The challenge we face is that a person’s recollection of their health problems is not reliable.     I’ll use back pain as an example.     Studies of large groups of people tell us that back pain is common. 20% or more of the population has a long term back complaint, where they experience some level of back discomfort or soreness on most days.  More than 30% of people experience intermittent episodes of back pain. more >>

 

Work Cancer: few applying for compensation

National News
Published on May 25, 2015

The Cancer Council of Western Australia believes that only about 10% of people suffering from cancer caused by the workplace make workers' compensation claims. Last year, about 395 claims were made, resulting in payouts of around $30m. It is believed that work exposure to cancer causing substances could be responsible for around 6.5% of all cancers diagnosed each year. The report found that a major reason for the lack of compensation claims is a lack of awareness of occupational risk factors for cancer. Although skin cancers accounted for around 77% of workplace cancers, mesothelioma from asbestos accounted for 72% of payouts.

 

Posties & home insurance: When a dog bites...

World News
Published on May 25, 2015

In the US, bites and other injuries caused by dogs account for more than one third of all home insurance claims according to a report from the Insurance Information Institute. Although claims numbers are falling, the cost of claims continues to increase. California appears to have the highest rate of dog injuries, followed by Ohio and New York. The average cost of claims related to dogs throughout the US was $32,072. If you're a postie, look out - dog bites are the most common cause of injury for walking postal workers, with the total compensation for the UPS amounting to around $3.7 billion per year. 

 

Cricket injury: compensation approved

NSW News
Published on May 25, 2015

A settlement has reportedly been reached bteween former fast bowler Nathan Bracken and Cricket Australia for a knee injury, although the matter is still to be resolved. The injury reportedly left Bracken with a limp and was unable to contunue his cricket career. He sured the governing body for failing to investigate, diagnose and treat his right knee. He was earning around $400,000 per year when injured, and was considered to be a number one ranked fast bowler in one-day and Twenty20 formats. He told Fairfax Media that when he forst approached Cricket Australia about injury insurance, he "pretty much got laughed out of the room."

 

Allegations: against Vic Small Business Minister

VIC News
Published on May 25, 2015

It was announced by the Premier on Saturday that the Victorian Small Business Minister, Adem Somyurek, had been stood down due to allegations of workplace bullying. The Minister's Chief of Staff made a formal complaint about Somyurek's "intimidating, aggresive and threatening" behaviour. Kevin Jones points out that the term "workplace bullying" has not been mentioned directly in connection with the case, possibly to keep the inquiry within the public service and the Department of Premier and Cabinet rather than referred to WorkSafe.