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Psychological claims: Part 4

Psychological claims: Part 4

   

Robert Aurbach | Getting ready for psychological claims - change the story
In this final part of a four part series, the discussion of readiness to assist in psychological claims turns to establishing an overall goal for rehabilitation. In prior articles we have discussed the beliefs and attitudes that impact upon the rehabilitation professional, the conceptual model that organises thinking about these injuries, and the gathering of relevant information. The problem with psychological claims is that people lock themselves into a repeating story about what it is that's wrong with them and the nature of their limitations. more >>

Maintaining a mentally healthy workplace - 2

Maintaining a mentally healthy workplace - 2

   

Tom Barton | Ingrid Ozols - founder and Director of the Mental Health at Work initiative - explains the importance of reading the signs of mental illness.
In part one we looked at the early warning signs of mental illness in the workplace, exploring how to deal with struggling employees and broach the issue of suicide. Now Ingrid Ozols explains the difference between intervening and interfering, the imperative for dealing with situations as they arise, the importance of constant communication and an overview of the return to work process. Intervening vs. more >>

Fact sheet: PSYCHO WHAAT? PSYCHOSOCIAL!

Fact sheet: PSYCHO WHAAT? PSYCHOSOCIAL!

   

Gabrielle Lis | The most common barriers to RTW are "psychosocial". Getting to know them makes it possible to overcome them.
“Psychosocial” is a word that gets used a lot in the disability management field and, while it can be daunting for the uninitiated, it means exactly what you’d expect – the combination of “psychological” and “social” (or interpersonal) factors that impact on a person’s ability to recover from injury or illness and return to work. Understanding that psychosocial factors play a role in determining when and how someone gets back into their normal routine is NOT the same as believing that the person’s health problem is “all in their head”. more >>

Who's the boss? Health and control in the workplace

Who's the boss? Health and control in the workplace

    

Friyana Bhabha | If a sense of workplace control is linked to good health, how can it be fostered?
Take Home Messages: Employee health is positively associated with a sense of workplace control and social support. Interventions that help improve a feeling of workplace control include: The formation of employee committees to identify workplace stressors and methods to reduce them;   Individual health promotion;   Interventions to increase employee physical activity or reduce stress through meditation; and   Ergonomic interventions. more >>

 

Be sceptical of back pain "quick fix" steroid injections

National News

Last year, 40,000 Australians had spinal cortisone injections in the hope of curbing pain in the lower back, arms, neck or legs. The Australian Financial Review reports that there is no reliable evidence to show these injections are effective. “These injections are bad science and bad medicine, but then a lot of what we do in medicine is based on a biologically plausible mechanism which is backed up by observational evidence. This means just about any treatment can appear to be effective.”

 

101 and still happy at work

World News

A New Jersey man celebrated his 101st birthday at work, as well as 73 years working for the same employer, Brisbane Times reports. Herman Goldman still works four days per week for a light fitting company. "Apart from a brief absence to serve in the US Army in World War Two, Mr Goldman has worked at Capitol Lighting since 1941."

 

Feeling bad at work can be a good thing

World News

New research finds that, contrary to popular opinion, it can be good to feel bad at work. Feeling good in the workplace can also lead to negative outcomes. The commonly-held assumption that positivity in the workplace produces positive outcomes, while negative emotions lead to negative outcomes, may be in need for reconsideration. This is partly due to this assumption failing to take into account the differences in work contexts which effect outcomes.

 

Cognitive-behavioural coping skills training has positive effects on rheumatoid arthritis

World News

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a complex autoimmune disease that affects 1 to 2 percent of adults, requires patients to not only cope with pain, disability and joint disfigurements, but also other stressors such as disrupted work, family life and marital functioning. While many pharmacological advances help some RA patients, residual pain and disability is common. Because of this, there is interest in psychosocial interventions for RA such as cognitive-behavioral and emotional processing approaches. A study revealed cognitive-behavioral coping skills training (CST) had positive effects on the pain and mood of patients that lasted for at least one year.

 

Mindfulness-based depression therapy reduces health care visits

World News

A mindfulness-based therapy for depression has the added benefit of reducing health-care visits among patients who often see their family doctors, according to a new study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES). The research showed that frequent health service users who received mindfulness-based cognitive therapy showed a significant reduction in non-mental health care visits over a one-year period, compared with those who received other types of group therapy.

 

Combined drugs and therapy most effective for severe nonchronic depression

World News

The odds that a person who suffers from severe, nonchronic depression will recover are improved by as much as 30 percent if they are treated with a combination of cognitive therapy and antidepressant medicine rather than by antidepressants alone. “Our results indicate that combining cognitive therapy with antidepressant medicine can make a much bigger difference than we had thought to about one-third of patients suffering from major depressive disorder."